stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a red poppy (101flowers)
Bow Tie

Why do I want to do this?

This seems to me to be one of those useful adult skills that nobody ever bothers to teach you, on a level with being able to shuffle cards with the minimum of fuss and bother. One of these days I may find myself terribly embarrassed upon being exposed as someone who can't tie a bow tie. (NB: a bow tie does not form part of my everyday attire, but I still think I should be able to do it.)


How will I know I've done it?

I'll be able to put a standard (i.e. not velcro, hook-and-eye or clip-on) bow tie on myself or another person, and make it look reasonable.


I'll record this in a post in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a stylised picture of a teapot (Default)
Line of Stars

What's this about?

From the BBC:
* Meteor showers are caused by debris from a comet burning up in our atmosphere
* This produces spectacular shooting stars which blaze across the night sky



Why do I want to do this?

Watching shooting stars? What's not to like?


How will I know I've done this?

I'll have seen at least three meteors in the same night.


I'll record this in a post in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a stylised picture of a teapot (Default)
Prospero

Why do I want to do this?

Museums are fantastic - I love wandering around, looking at beautiful things, interesting things, important things, things that meant something. I don't go to as many as I'd like, and when I do go I tend to stick to ones I already know.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll have spent at least an hour in each of six different museums. I will have previously visited three of these, but the other three will be new to me.


I'll record this in posts in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a stylised picture of a teapot (Default)
Hedgers

What's this about?

TED is a fantastic thing. Interested people talking about interesting things, things they love. Many, many fascinating talks to watch online.


Why do I want to do this?

Because it's dead interesting, and I'll never do it otherwise.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll have watched 101 TED videos from beginning to end.


I'll record this in posts in this journal. Click on the numbers below to see talks I've watched.

1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32 / 33 / 34 / 35 / 36 / 37 / 38 / 39 / 40 / 41 / 42 / 43 / 44 / 45 / 46 / 47 / 48 / 49 / 50 / 51 / 52 / 53 / 54 / 55 / 56 / 57 / 58 / 59 / 60 / 61 / 62 / 63 / 64 / 65 / 66 / 67 / 68 / 69 / 70 / 71 / 72 / 73 / 74 / 75 / 76 / 77 / 78 / 79 / 80 / 81 / 82 / 83 / 84 / 85 / 86 / 87 / 88 / 89 / 90 / 91 / 92 / 93 / 94 / 95 / 96 / 97 / 98 / 99 / 100 / 101
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Why do I want to do this?

I could do with sharpening up my vocal technique. I think - hope - it will build my confidence, too.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll have spent at least one hour with a self-described singing teacher, concentrating on improving my singing voice.


I'll record this in a post in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a rose window (101church)
Apostles' Creed

What's this about?

Back on my last list, I had the following goal: Articulate my opinions re. Apostles’, Nicene and Athanasian creeds, Thirty-Nine Articles [pdf] and UCCF Doctrinal Basis. I got about five clauses into the Apostles' Creed. This goal is to complete the work I began there.


Why do I want to do this?

The creeds, we're told, summarise what I'm supposed to believe as a Christian. The Thirty-Nine Articles add to this, marking out what makes the Church of England distinctive, though unless I get ordained or similar I probably won't be asked to put my name to them. However, had I ever made it onto the committee of the Christian Union (you laugh, but it might have happened, had Symphony Orchestra not rehearsed on Tuesday nights), I would have been asked to sign the [Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship] Doctrinal Basis. I want to explore just how comfortable I am with all these things I'm meant to believe.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll have articulated my interpretation of and feelings about each clause of the five summaries of belief.


This can be tracked by following the credo tag at [personal profile] el_staplador.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a stylised picture of a teapot (Default)
Why do I want to do this?

Another of those things I feel I ought to be able to do, and can't. Currently I can do the Great Bear/Saucepan/Charles' Wain/what have you, Cassiopeia, and Orion. It's a bit pathetic, really, when all it takes is a bit of looking.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll be able to point out fifteen (twelve, plus the three I already know) separate constellations in the night sky without having to refer to a plan, guide, or other aid.


I'll record this in posts in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Music Theory

What's this about?

Music theory is the study of how music works. It examines the language and notation of music. It seeks to identify patterns and structures in composers' techniques, across or within genres, styles, or historical periods. In a grand sense, music theory distills and analyzes the fundamental parameters or elements of music – rhythm, harmony (harmonic function), melody, structure, form, texture, etc. (Wikipedia.

Developing literacy with the tonal language forms a key part of a rounded education for performers, composers and listeners of all kinds. An understanding of how written symbols relate to the elements of music, and having the skills to interpret and translate them into sounds, empowers us to communicate and experience music in a meaningful way. Without knowledge of notation it is impossible for classical musicians to access their repertoire with ease or to rehearse together; and this repertoire could not be heard at all had composers not been able to write it down. So, music theory is a very practical subject that is completely entwined with performance and composition. (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music - .pdf)


Why do I want to do this?

I love music, but I'm very conscious that I don't really know much about how it works. Oh, I can read it, I can play it, I can sing it, but I don't really understand chords, intervals, majors and minors. I think that knowing this sort of stuff will make me a better musician.

I'm going for Grade V because... it's kind of traditional. In the words of the ABRSM, again, A longstanding ABRSM benchmark is that a pass at Grade 5 or above in Theory of Music must be obtained before candidates can enter for Grades 6, 7 or 8 Practical exams. We believe that a thorough understanding of the elements of music is essential for a full and satisfying performance at these higher grades.


How will I know I've done this?

I will be able to sit and pass a Grade V Theory of Music paper. (I may or may not take this examination officially, but I ought to be able to get hold of a paper and a marking scheme, and my husband will be able to mark my efforts.)


I'll record this in posts on this journal.


This goal may be modified or replaced if I find Grade V stupidly easy - in which case I'll probably move up a few grades.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a stylised picture of a teapot (Default)
First Aid Kit

Why do I want to do this?

I'm fairly squeamish - which fact alone is never going to stop me being in a situation where somebody's hurt and needs attention. I'd like to have a better idea of what to do.


How will I know when I've done it?

I'll be a qualified first aider.


I'll record this in posts on this journal.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a red poppy (101flowers)
Sunset Over English Channel

What's this about?

Meteorology, says Wikipedia, is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and short term forecasting (in contrast with climatology). Studies in the field stretch back millennia, though significant progress in meteorology did not occur until the eighteenth century. The nineteenth century saw breakthroughs occur after observing networks developed across several countries. Breakthroughs in weather forecasting were achieved in the latter half of the twentieth century, after the development of the computer.

Meteorological phenomena are observable weather events which illuminate and are explained by the science of meteorology. Those events are bound by the variables that exist in Earth's atmosphere: They are temperature, air pressure, water vapor, and the gradients and interactions of each variable, and how they change in time.


I'd just like to be able to understand a weather map.


Why do I want to do this?

It seems like fairly basic knowledge that I don't understand at all. So.


How will I know when I've done it?

Good question. This is probably my vaguest goal. I will call it done when I can look at a pressure map and explain what the wiggly lines [are likely to] mean for the weather.


I'll record this in occasional posts in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: '101' superimposed on a camera lens (101photography)
Royal Arms: Charles I

What's this about?

The Royal Arms has changed through the ages. It didn't look like the picture above all the way up to 1640, and it doesn't look like that today. Quite apart from anything else, it hasn't always been the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom, though I'll be concentrating on 1603 onwards for simplicity's sake. The heraldic changes reflect the historical changes.


Why do I want to do this?

I've always been interested in heraldry, and would like to get a bit more comfortable with the language and principles.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll have a set of at least eleven photographs depicting the various forms the Royal Arms has taken since 1603. I will include earlier examples if I can find them, but will not break my heart if I can't collect the entire set. I will have written a blazon (heraldic description) to accompany each photograph. In addition, I will be able to put them in chronological order using the heraldic features alone.


I'll record this on Flickr.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Horizontal Musical Angels

What's this about?

[personal profile] ancientandmodern is the journal where I talk about hymns. A typical post would include the lyrics, a video, if I can find a decent one, a short(ish) meditation, and possibly some historical notes on the lyricist and composer.


Why do I want to do this?

I've let this slide recently, and it's a pity. I think I need a bit of a kick to post more often.


How will I know when it's done?

I'll have posted articles on 101 hymns at [personal profile] ancientandmodern.


Progress can be tracked on the journal itself, and at this post, where I'll put links to individual articles.


1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32 / 33 / 34 / 35 / 36 / 37 / 38 / 39 / 40 / 41 / 42 / 43 / 44 / 45 / 46 / 47 / 48 / 49 / 50 / 51 / 52 / 53 / 54 / 55 / 56 / 57 / 58 / 59 / 60 / 61 / 62 / 63 / 64 / 65 / 66 / 67 / 68 / 69 / 70 / 71 / 72 / 73 / 74 / 75 / 76 / 77 / 78 / 79 / 80 / 81 / 82 / 83 / 84 / 85 / 86 / 87 / 88 / 89 / 90 / 91 / 92 / 93 / 94 / 95 / 96 / 97 / 98 / 99 / 100 / 101

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