stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Guitar, Rainbow

Why do I want to do this?

This is a variant on a goal from the last list: learn to play the harmonica. I had very worthy reasons for this - to be able to accompany others at community sing-songs, carol singing, bus camps, or whatever. This proved impractical on two counts. Firstly, it was too vague. I could always pick out a tune on the mouth organ, albeit somewhat haltingly, so I hadn't really set myself a challenge. Secondly, I never got a chance to act on these good intentions because, as someone who could both carry a tune and remember all the words to all the verses to pretty much all the songs anybody ever wanted to sing, I was much more in demand as a singer.


How will I know I've done this?

I'll be sufficiently proficient on the guitar to be able to accompany myself singing the entirety of one song. It doesn't matter what the song is.


I'll record this in posts in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Cello, Rainbow

Why do I want to do this?

I'm never going to be the next Jacqueline du Pré, but I do enjoy playing my cello. The trouble is, now I'm not in any sort of orchestra, I don't make time to do it.


How will I know I've done this?

Every month for the duration of the 1001 days, I'll have spent an hour playing my cello.


I'll record this in posts in this journal.

- 30 November 2010 - an hour on Classics For Idiots and a few scales. Mostly The Swan.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Hey Diddle Diddl

What's this about?

The Proms. The Henry Wood Promenade Concerts presented by the BBC - 'the world's greatest classical music festival'. So much music! Thirty sounds ambitious, but that's only an average of ten per year, and there are about one hundred every year. It's all on the wireless and the TV; besides, I can easily get up to London to see the Real Thing.


Why do I want to do it?

Free music, people! I know shockingly little music, and all I need is a little kick to listen to it.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll have heard thirty Prom concerts from beginning to end.


I'll record this in posts in this journal.

1 / 2 / 3 / 4
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Why do I want to do this?

I could do with sharpening up my vocal technique. I think - hope - it will build my confidence, too.


How will I know I've done it?

I'll have spent at least one hour with a self-described singing teacher, concentrating on improving my singing voice.


I'll record this in a post in this journal.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Music Theory

What's this about?

Music theory is the study of how music works. It examines the language and notation of music. It seeks to identify patterns and structures in composers' techniques, across or within genres, styles, or historical periods. In a grand sense, music theory distills and analyzes the fundamental parameters or elements of music – rhythm, harmony (harmonic function), melody, structure, form, texture, etc. (Wikipedia.

Developing literacy with the tonal language forms a key part of a rounded education for performers, composers and listeners of all kinds. An understanding of how written symbols relate to the elements of music, and having the skills to interpret and translate them into sounds, empowers us to communicate and experience music in a meaningful way. Without knowledge of notation it is impossible for classical musicians to access their repertoire with ease or to rehearse together; and this repertoire could not be heard at all had composers not been able to write it down. So, music theory is a very practical subject that is completely entwined with performance and composition. (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music - .pdf)


Why do I want to do this?

I love music, but I'm very conscious that I don't really know much about how it works. Oh, I can read it, I can play it, I can sing it, but I don't really understand chords, intervals, majors and minors. I think that knowing this sort of stuff will make me a better musician.

I'm going for Grade V because... it's kind of traditional. In the words of the ABRSM, again, A longstanding ABRSM benchmark is that a pass at Grade 5 or above in Theory of Music must be obtained before candidates can enter for Grades 6, 7 or 8 Practical exams. We believe that a thorough understanding of the elements of music is essential for a full and satisfying performance at these higher grades.


How will I know I've done this?

I will be able to sit and pass a Grade V Theory of Music paper. (I may or may not take this examination officially, but I ought to be able to get hold of a paper and a marking scheme, and my husband will be able to mark my efforts.)


I'll record this in posts on this journal.


This goal may be modified or replaced if I find Grade V stupidly easy - in which case I'll probably move up a few grades.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Jazz

Why do I want to do this?

I love jazz, but I hardly ever get up and go to a jazz night off my own bat. This goal is meant to be a little kick in the right direction.


How will I know when I've done it?

I will have gone to a jazz night, gig, concert, whatever, not because that's what a friend's birthday party happened to involve, nor because someone I knew was in it, but because I wanted to.


I'll record this in a post here.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Ave Maria

What's this about? Why do I want to do it?

A while back it occurred to me that, if one searched the whole history of church/religious music, one could find probably 90% of the verses of the Bible. I'm curious to see how difficult that would be. I think that trying to find the whole Bible in song is probably a little overambitious for 1001 days, but I'm pretty sure that I can do 1001 verses. The only snag is... I don't yet have anywhere to put them.


How will I know when it's done?

I will have set up some form of repository, and on this I will have identified and/or linked to pieces of music that together set 1001 verses of the Bible. (Yes, the Apocrypha counts, though I doubt that it would seriously inconvenience me if it didn't.)


I'll record this on the yet-to-be-set-up repository, to which I'll link here.

1001 verses at the [personal profile] musicalbible:

1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32 / 33 / 34 / 35 / 36 / 37 / 38 / 39 / 40 / 41 / 42 / 43 / 44 / 45 / 46 / 47 / 48 / 49 / 50 / 51 / 52 / 53 / 54 / 55 / 56 / 57 / 58 / 59 / 60 / 61 / 62 / 63 / 64 / 65 / 66 / 67 / 68 / 69 / 70 / 71 / 72 / 73 / 74 / 75 / 76 / 77 / 78 / 79 / 80 / 81 / 82 / 83 / 84 / 85 / 86 / 87 / 88 / 89 / 90 / 91 / 92 / 93 / 94 / 95 / 96 / 97 / 98 / 99 / 100 / 101 / 102 / 103 / 104 / 105 / 106 / 107 / 108 / 109 / 110 / 111 / 112 / 113 / 114 / 115
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Self in Hat

What's this about?

And, more to the point, what does the picture of me in my little brother's hat have to do with anything? Well, I took it towards the end of a rather raucous party, which is a context in which you are fairly likely to discover me singing. Being of a somewhat retiring nature, I don't tend to open my mouth in front of strangers.


Why do I want to do this?

Singing is an important part of my life in both sacred and secular contexts. I'm not a great singer - but I'm not actually a bad one; I'm just very underconfident (it comes of living all your life with people who sing your own part better than you do). I want to force myself out of my comfort zone.


How will I know when it's done?

I will have sung a stretch of music at least four bars long, either alone or in an ensemble small enough that my voice can be clearly distinguished and attributed to me, in front of a group of people that includes strangers, three times. Alternatively, I will have one recording of my singing, other than the Cats' Duet, posted somewhere on the internet, or broadcast as part of my husband's Advent Calendar, and will have sung a stretch of music at least four bars long, either alone or in an ensemble small enough that my voice can be clearly distinguished and attributed to me, twice.


I'll record this in this journal, probably on this post. If a recording ends up on the internet, I'll post a link to it.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
David, Miriam

What's this about?

I'm a committed member of my church choir, singing (in a typical week, in termtime) two services on Sunday and a practice on Thursday. Our repertoire covers most of the standards of the [Anglican] English choral tradition, not to mention a few things that no other church choir in the country is known to have touched, swinging happily between about 1550 and 2010. Occasionally there's an opportunity to sing a few solo lines or a solo verse. I'd like to take up such opportunities.


Why do I want to do this?

Singing is an important part of my life in both sacred and secular contexts. I'm not a great singer - but I'm not actually a bad one; I'm just very underconfident (it comes of living all your life with people who sing your own part better than you do). I want to force myself out of my comfort zone.


How will I know when it's done?

I will have sung a stretch of music at least four bars long, either alone or in an ensemble small enough that my voice can be clearly distinguished and attributed to me, in the course of worship, four times.


I'll record this in this journal, probably on this post.
stapsdoes101things: detail of a hymnbook page showing hymn no. 101, tune 'St Bernard' (101music)
Horizontal Musical Angels

What's this about?

[personal profile] ancientandmodern is the journal where I talk about hymns. A typical post would include the lyrics, a video, if I can find a decent one, a short(ish) meditation, and possibly some historical notes on the lyricist and composer.


Why do I want to do this?

I've let this slide recently, and it's a pity. I think I need a bit of a kick to post more often.


How will I know when it's done?

I'll have posted articles on 101 hymns at [personal profile] ancientandmodern.


Progress can be tracked on the journal itself, and at this post, where I'll put links to individual articles.


1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32 / 33 / 34 / 35 / 36 / 37 / 38 / 39 / 40 / 41 / 42 / 43 / 44 / 45 / 46 / 47 / 48 / 49 / 50 / 51 / 52 / 53 / 54 / 55 / 56 / 57 / 58 / 59 / 60 / 61 / 62 / 63 / 64 / 65 / 66 / 67 / 68 / 69 / 70 / 71 / 72 / 73 / 74 / 75 / 76 / 77 / 78 / 79 / 80 / 81 / 82 / 83 / 84 / 85 / 86 / 87 / 88 / 89 / 90 / 91 / 92 / 93 / 94 / 95 / 96 / 97 / 98 / 99 / 100 / 101

August 2013

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